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In the Colony She Was the First

Andrew Whitehead (1768–1832)

In 1801 working as a clerk in London, Scots-born Andrew failed to include a £40 bill in his master’s records. He was transported for fourteen years for theft. He arrived in Van Diemen’s Land on the Calcutta, in 1804.
Being literate and intelligent, he was given responsibilities in the new settlement. Just three years into his sentence he received a free pardon, and was appointed overseer of the government’s Prospect Farm. He also received a number of land grants.
At Herdsman’s Cove his neighbour was Martha Hayes and her two daughters by Lt. Bowen. In 1811 Martha married Andrew, by now ‘an elderly man’. In time they had two children, Mary and Andrew.
In 1814 he was caught helping to smuggle 2,800 gallons of rum into the Colony, and was placed under house arrest for one year.

Colonial artist Joseph Lycett’s ‘view taken from north side of the Derwent River, at the entrance of Herdsman's Cove, and opposite the Dwelling of Mr. Morris\’.  Engraving published in London in 1824.
Colonial artist Joseph Lycett’s ‘view taken from north side of the Derwent River, at the entrance of Herdsman's Cove, and opposite the Dwelling of Mr. Morris\’. Engraving published in London in 1824.

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