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In the Colony She Was the First

Mary Hayes (1762–1843)

At their London pub Henry and Mary Hayes had received stolen jewellery, but they were inept criminals. In the bar a servant saw Mary holding a diamond necklace, and her daughter Martha with a pearl necklace and diamond drops. ‘Lord, ma’am, what a handsome diamond necklace that is!’ the servant exclaimed. Mary failed to buy the girl’s silence, and she reported the theft to the police.
From Tasmania's Convicts: How Felons Built a Free Society by Alison Alexander

Mary Hayes was convicted of receiving stolen goods (fabric, jewellery, silver, linen and clothing) valued in excess of £1200. She was sentenced to transportation for 14 years. She sailed to New South Wales on the Glatton, in 1802. Accompanying her was her teenage daughter Martha. Her husband Henry was found not guilty. He sailed separately as a free settler, joining Mary in the colonies. Together they arrived in Van Diemen’s land on the Calcutta, in 1803.

Mary and Henry ran a ‘fence’ operation out of their pub in Cripplegate.  In thieves’ slang a ‘fence’ is the middleman, the person who knowingly receives stolen goods, then resells them into a legitimate buyer.
Mary and Henry ran a ‘fence’ operation out of their pub in Cripplegate. In thieves’ slang a ‘fence’ is the middleman, the person who knowingly receives stolen goods, then resells them into a legitimate buyer.

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