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Three Months on the Town

John Burris (1841-?)

In 1873 at St. John the Baptist, River Ouse in central Tasmania, John Burris married Sarah Anne Squires. He was a 33-year-old blacksmith and she a 21-year-old servant.
In an era where horses were the main form of transport and an important part of rural life, John and his blacksmithing father Edward would have been extremely busy tradesmen, serving their local district. Moreover, blacksmiths made all sorts of other items, including wrought iron work.
Like the previous generation, John and Sarah went on to have a large family, including sons Wybert, Aliph and Artemus. Following the birth of their youngest child the family took the huge step of leaving the central highlands, and moving their family to Hobart.

From the 1860s until the advent of mass-produced steel, wrought iron work was used to adorn Tasmanian buildings, as decorative lacework, railings and columns.
From the 1860s until the advent of mass-produced steel, wrought iron work was used to adorn Tasmanian buildings, as decorative lacework, railings and columns.

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