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It's Doherty and I'm Free

James 'Jim' Doherty (1874-1933)

The 7th son to Tom & Agnes, Jim Doherty was a piner who worked the Gordon River. He enlisted in 1916, at age 41, and was posted to the 40th Battalion, serving on the Western Front. In the Battle of Amiens he used donkeys to deliver ammunition to troops in the front line.
“In addition to the men who were killed or wounded with their animals, the bravery of two men was most conspicuous to the rest of the battalion. These men were number 5690, private James Doherty, and number 5691, private W.J. Dalting, who kept their animals quiet and led them along the road with ammunition when it appeared impossible to live there…
- F.C. Green, The Fortieth: a record of the 40th Battalion, A.I.F. (1922).

Rain was a constant on the battlefields of France.  Where normal motorised transport was defeated by the muddy conditions, mules and donkeys were used to deliver ammunition across the fields. James Doherty was mentioned in official army documents for his bravery and skill in undertaking this difficult and dangerous task.
Rain was a constant on the battlefields of France. Where normal motorised transport was defeated by the muddy conditions, mules and donkeys were used to deliver ammunition across the fields. James Doherty was mentioned in official army documents for his bravery and skill in undertaking this difficult and dangerous task.

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