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The Wildest Dreams of Samuel Phillips

Sarah Patrick (1805-1875)

In January 1829 Sarah Patrick, a 24-year-old country girl in the English village of Corby, gave birth to an ‘illegitimate’ child, a daughter whom she named Ann. Just weeks later, the child’s father Samuel Phillips was convicted for poaching. Being his third such offence, he was transported.
Sarah raised the daughter on her own. She didn’t marry, or have more children. There is some evidence that she worked as a washerwoman, and received support from her brother. Unlike Sarah, he could read and write.
Twenty-five years later, her daughter’s father returned, by now a man of means. Six weeks later, he took Sarah Patrick as his lawful wedded wife. He set up a farm and built her a house, a good home which they shared for the next twenty years. Sarah Phillips (nee Patrick) died just short of her 70th birthday.

The 11th century Church of St. John the Baptist in the English village of Corby, setting of the double ceremony, the wedding of Sarah and Samuel, and the christening of their grandson (S.P. Starsmore) on 30 March 1854.
The 11th century Church of St. John the Baptist in the English village of Corby, setting of the double ceremony, the wedding of Sarah and Samuel, and the christening of their grandson (S.P. Starsmore) on 30 March 1854.

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