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Therapeutic Relations Redefined

Bert Frimley (1894-1916)

Bert Frimley, bootmaker and jockey, was a grandson of convict John Frimley. At 5 feet 4 inches (163cm) he was only just tall enough to enlist. Allotted to the 12th Battalion, then the 26th in Egypt, he fractured his ankle during a training exercise, but still joined the 47th Battalion when it was moved to France in June 1916. Barely six weeks later the 47th were detailed to capture Pozieres Heights and the high ground around Mouquet Farm. Battle conditions were among the worst, with shells falling like hail. No. 2843 Private Bert Frimley, killed in action, was buried 500 yards northeast of Pozieres. Later he was re-buried at Serre Road No. 2 Cemetery, between Amiens and Arras in northern France. At the time of the reburial Bert’s identity disc was recovered, and forwarded to his family in Tasmania.

Photograph of an unidentified soldier viewing the Australian graves on the battlefield of Pozieres. Bert Frimley was one of 7,000 killed and 16,000 wounded during 6 weeks of combat to take this small ridge.
Photograph of an unidentified soldier viewing the Australian graves on the battlefield of Pozieres. Bert Frimley was one of 7,000 killed and 16,000 wounded during 6 weeks of combat to take this small ridge.

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