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Therapeutic Relations Redefined

Charlie Frimley (1892-?)

Labourer Charles Frimley, grandson of the boy convict John Frimley, enlisted in August 1916, and was allotted to the 26th Battalion but later transferred to the 12th. In May 1917 the 12th Battalion was part of the allied attempt to break the Hindenburg line near Bullecourt. Lance Corporal Charles Frimley received a penetrating wound to his neck and face. Evacuated to England for treatment, it was decided the bullet could not be removed.
He returned to the front line for nearly six months before he was forced to seek further treatment for his neck wound. Lance Corporal Frimley’s war was over, and he was returned to Australia in 1919. Undeterred, Charles Frimley volunteered for service again during the Second World War.

Sleep was near impossible for those serving at the Front.  Here an Australian soldier in his trench shelter, in the second line of trenches, during the fighting near Bullecourt. His pack and tools can be seen resting near the opening of his shelter.
Sleep was near impossible for those serving at the Front. Here an Australian soldier in his trench shelter, in the second line of trenches, during the fighting near Bullecourt. His pack and tools can be seen resting near the opening of his shelter.

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