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Therapeutic Relations Redefined

Harry Frimley (1897-1943)

Harry Frimley, grandson of the convict John Frimley, was an 18-year-old carpenter when he enlisted in February 1916. He was allotted to the newly formed 40th Battalion. For many in the 40th, the Battle of Messines in June 1917 was their first experience of combat. In the prelude to the main attack, the men at Regina camp waiting to go into the trenches were saturated with gas. Private Frimley was one of the casualties evacuated for treatment.
Harry re-joined his battalion in September 1917. Twelve months later, appendicitis meant leaving the front line and a trip to England. He was still there recovering when hostilities ceased in November 1918. His reduced state of health saw him returned to Australia for discharge in December 1918.
Later Harry and Ruby Frimley moved to Queenstown on Tasmania’s west coast, and raised a family of four.

During the First World War, chemical weapons were responsible for an estimated 100,000 deaths, and more than a million non-fatal casualties.  Here, photographed by Frank Hurley in September 1917 are soldiers of the 45th Battalion wearing gas respirators at Garter Point, in the Ypres Sector. Harry Frimley was poisoned by gas and evacuated for treatment.
During the First World War, chemical weapons were responsible for an estimated 100,000 deaths, and more than a million non-fatal casualties. Here, photographed by Frank Hurley in September 1917 are soldiers of the 45th Battalion wearing gas respirators at Garter Point, in the Ypres Sector. Harry Frimley was poisoned by gas and evacuated for treatment.

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