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I'd Do It All Again!

Thomas Burbury (1809-1870)

When Thomas Burbury died in 1870, newspapers reported the passing of a ‘highly respectable colonist [who] commanded the esteem of his fellow men [and] raised a highly respectable family’. No mention that forty years before young Thomas had been condemned for a machine-breaking riot. Or that he’d been transported for Life.
Thomas arrived in 1832. His wife Mary and infant daughter came six weeks later. Mary tracked Thomas to his shepherd run, out in the middle of nowhere. Thomas’ crude bush hut was the starting point for an extraordinary family tale.
A trusted servant, he was appointed Field Constable, and received his Conditional Pardon after three years. He started acquiring land, and by 1863 owned 7,256 acres, farming sheep and some cattle. He leased an additional 9,219 acres. He also became a local councillor.

A defaced copper penny reworked into a token of love, was Thomas Burbury’s parting gift to his sweetheart. One side features the text 'T. Burbury Condemned March 24 1832'. The other side features the text 'When this you see think on me'.
A defaced copper penny reworked into a token of love, was Thomas Burbury’s parting gift to his sweetheart. One side features the text 'T. Burbury Condemned March 24 1832'. The other side features the text 'When this you see think on me'.

Copyright © Roar Film 2012 This material may be reproduced, communicated, published and adapted free of charge for non-commercial educational purposes.

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