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Dalton and Knibbs

Mary Ann Dalton (c. 1832-?)

At age nineteen, nursemaid Mary Ann Dalton was transported from Dublin to Van Diemen’s Land for ‘stealing a shawl’. Mary Ann had priors for shoplifting as well as she’d stolen a couple of dolls. She sailed on the convict transport, John William Dare, arriving in 1852.
Shortly after her arrival she spent time at the Cascades Female Factory, then was assigned to work for a timber dealer, Henry John Chapman in Goulburn Street Hobart. This was short-lived, and next she was sent to the rural district of Oatlands to work on the farm of George Wilson. While in Oatlands Mary Ann married James Knibbs in May 1854, and later that year she received her Ticket of leave. The only other entry on her Conduct Record was a fine for drunkeness in January 1855. Mary Ann and James went on to raise eight children.

Launceston architect Frank Heyward (1876-1942) made a photographic record of a number of Tasmanian buildings and stone features such as horse troughs. Many locations are identified, like this example of a colonial-era house in Oatlands.
Launceston architect Frank Heyward (1876-1942) made a photographic record of a number of Tasmanian buildings and stone features such as horse troughs. Many locations are identified, like this example of a colonial-era house in Oatlands.

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